Employee monitoring software offers many benefits, from cybersecurity to productivity, but when poorly implemented, it can backfire.

Like companies of every size in every sector, the coronavirus pandemic radically restructured the work environment for small and medium-sized businesses. Now, it’s clear that the hybrid workforce created by COVID-19 is here to stay, as 57% of small and midsize businesses expect that they will continue offering remote work even after COVID-19.

In many ways, this is excellent news. It reveals that many companies possess the agility that will be required to survive and thrive when the pandemic subsides. Increasingly, remote work is in demand by employees and expected by consumers while helping companies cut costs and increase competitiveness at a critical time.

It also presents significant logistical challenges for small businesses, which may be unprepared to embrace remote work as a long-term, comprehensive business solution. In response, they will need to invest in the technical resources to embrace this dynamic environment without compromise.

That’s why, among other tools, many companies are turning to employee monitoring software to try to attain some level of control over their processes and outcomes.

Across industries, this software is ubiquitous, and it offers many benefits, from cybersecurity to productivity, but when poorly implemented, it can backfire, reducing employee buy-in when it’s needed most. Therefore, leaders need to understand the benefits of employee monitoring while keeping implementation top of mind.

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